If

IF you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:
If you can dream – and not make dreams your master;
If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
‘ Or walk with Kings – nor lose the common touch,
if neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And – which is more – you’ll be a Man, my son!

http://www.kipling.org.uk/poems_if.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhagavad_Gita#Message_of_the_Gita

Ramakrishna said that the essential message of the Gita can be obtained by repeating the word several times,[75]
“‘Gita, Gita, Gita’, you begin, but then find yourself saying ‘ta-Gi, ta-Gi, ta-Gi’.
Tagi means one who has renounced everything for God.”[citation needed]

According to Swami Vivekananda, “If one reads this one Shloka
— क्लैब्यं मा स्म गमः पार्थ नैतत्त्वय्युपपद्यते । क्षुद्रं हृदयदौर्बल्यं त्यक्त्वोत्तिष्ठ परंतप॥ — one gets all the merits of reading the entire Gita; for in this one Shloka lies imbedded the whole Message of the Gita.[76]
“ Do not yield to unmanliness, O son of Partha. It does not become you. Shake off this base faint-heartnedness and arise,
O scorcher of enemies! (2.3) ”

Mahatma Gandhi writes, “The object of the Gita appears to me to be that of showing the most excellent way to attain self-realization” and this can be achieved by selfless action, “By desireless action; by renouncing fruits of action; by dedicating all activities to God, i.e., by surrendering oneself to Him body and soul.” Gandhi called Gita, The Gospel of Selfless Action.[77]

Eknath Easwaran writes that the Gita’s subject is “the war within, the struggle for self-mastery that every human being must wage if he or she is to emerge from life victorious”,[78] and “The language of battle is often found in the scriptures, for it conveys the strenuous, long, drawn-out campaign we must wage to free ourselves from the tyranny of the ego, the cause of all our suffering and sorrow”.[79]